Unified Patent Court Agreement Ratification

The rules for representation in court were approved in September 2015. These include the requirements of the European Patent Litigation Certificate (for which university courses are accredited) and equivalent certificates accepted during a transitional period. Lawyers with a law degree are excluded from the EPLC. [42] The single patent and the unified patent court are the building blocks of the so-called single patent package, which will complement and strengthen the centralised patent granting system in Europe. They will offer users a low-cost option for patent protection and dispute resolution across Europe. Unitary patents will make it possible to obtain unitary patent protection in up to 25 EU Member States by filing a single application with the EPO, making the procedure simpler and less costly for applicants. The EPV will be an international court with jurisdiction over patents granted by the EPO. This specialised court will enable patents to be applied throughout Europe, provide greater legal certainty and reduce legal costs. The Court relies on an international treaty, the UPCA. In the UK, there is no need to pass a formal law authorising treaties before they are ratified, but Ponsonby`s rule provides that they will be submitted to Parliament on the ground[144], which the government did for the UPC Convention of 23 June 2013. [145] The Intellectual Property Act 2014 was approved by Parliament and came into force on May 14, 2014.

Section 17 authorises the Secretary of State to provide, by decision, for the implementation of the jurisdiction of the Unified Patent Court in the United Kingdom if a draft decision has been approved by Parliament. [146] This means that ratification of the UPC will not take place until the corresponding implementing ordinances have been approved by Parliament. . . .